Endo-what? You might be wondering what’s behind the term? I felt the same way a few months ago! But after I have learned more about the subject, I seriously ask myself how it is possible that so few people have heard of the disease? Because 1 in 10 menstruating people is affected by endometriosis.  

Endometriosis is more than just severe menstrual pain 

There is so much more to endometriosis than just severe menstrual pain. It is a chronic, very painful and difficult to treat disease of people with an uterus. Outside the uterine cavity, uncontrolled growths of the lining of the uterus form. These endometriosis lesions can grow and spread further. Unfortunately, the mucous membrane outside the uterus is also subject to hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle. The problem here, however, is that the bleeding takes place outside the uterus and the mucous membrane cannot be properly discharged here and flow out of the body. In short, it is a bit like a menstrual period, only in the wrong place. 

The unknown disease

Endometriosis is not a phenomenon of our current prosperous society, but has rather existed for decades. It is one of the most common chronic diseases in people with an uterus. Statistically speaking, we should all either know an affected person ourselves or at least know what endometriosis is. But it is a disease that is often invisible and unknown to the public. Because, as it often happens with womxn diseases, endometriosis has no lobby, no research funds. The lack of research also results in a lack of expertise and deficits in treatment. And so the causes, symptoms and treatment options are still relatively unknown.  

March is worldwide dedicated to endometriosis

For a few years now, March has been considered ‘EndoMarch’. This month, campaigns are taking place worldwide to promote the visibility and education of endometriosis in our society. After all, raising awareness of invisible diseases is extremely important. The focus is not only on endometriosis, but also on other related chronic disorders and painful diseases, such as myoma adenomyosis. 

Wishes for the future 

It is time that more people know what endometriosis is and that the disease no longer remains unknown in our society. People with endometriosis need a voice, a lobby. Because it is time to break taboo topics and place womxn-specific topics in the heart of our society. This is the only way to get money invested for researching  treatment options and identifying the causes of the disease. Because menstrual pain is not normal and this must be socially recognised!